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THE ARTICLE

Millard Fillmore was born in the Finger Lakes country of New York in 1800. He was the 13th President of the United States, serving from 1850-1853. As a youth, he endured the hardships of frontier life and lived in a log cabin. His rise to wealth and the White House demonstrated that through hard work and some ability, “an uninspiring man could make the American dream come true”.

In 1823 he was admitted to the bar; seven years later he moved his law practice to Buffalo, in New York state. He held state office and for eight years was a member of the House of Representatives. In 1848, he was elected Vice President. He presided over the Senate during the months of nerve-wracking debates over the Compromise of 1850 when the south wanted to leave the Union.

The sudden death of President Zachary Taylor in July 1850 elevated Fillmore to President. One of his first bills was the Fugitive Slave Act, in which runaway slaves had to be returned to their owners. Opponents nicknamed it the ‘Bloodhound Law’ after the dogs used to hunt escaped slaves. He also saw California become the 31st state and abolished the slave trade (but not slavery) in the District of Columbia.

He was quite active with his foreign policy. He championed the rising trade with Japan and sent Commodore Matthew C. Perry to establish relations with the Japanese. He quashed Napoleon III's attempt to annex Hawaii by threatening military action, and did likewise with the British over their efforts to invade Cuba. Out of office, he opposed President Lincoln throughout the Civil War. He died on March 8, 1874.

Article adapted from www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/millardfillmore

         
         From www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents


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LISTENING GAP FILL


 

Millard Fillmore was born in the Finger Lakes country of New York in 1800. He was the 13th President of the United States, serving from 1850-1853. __________________, he endured the hardships of frontier life and lived in a log cabin. __________________ and the White House demonstrated that through hard work and some ability, “an uninspiring man could make the American __________________”.

In 1823 he was __________________; seven years later he moved his law practice to Buffalo, in New York state. __________________ and for eight years was a member of the House of Representatives. In 1848, he was elected Vice President. He presided over the Senate __________________ of nerve-wracking debates over the Compromise of 1850 when the south wanted to leave the Union.

The sudden death of President Zachary Taylor in July 1850 elevated Fillmore to President. One __________________ was the Fugitive Slave Act, in which runaway slaves had to be returned to their owners. Opponents nicknamed it the ‘Bloodhound Law’ after the dogs used to __________________. He also saw California become the 31st state and abolished the slave trade (__________________) in the District of Columbia.

He was __________________ his foreign policy. He championed the rising trade with Japan and sent Commodore Matthew C. Perry to __________________ with the Japanese. He quashed Napoleon III's attempt to annex Hawaii by threatening military action, and did likewise with the British over their __________________ Cuba. Out of office, he opposed President Lincoln throughout the Civil War. He died on March 8, 1874.


  CORRECT THE SPELLING

Millard Fillmore was born in the Finger Lakes country of New York in 1800. He was the 13th President of the United States, serving from 1850-1853. As a youth, he dureden the hardships of frontier life and lived in a log cabin. His rise to whealt and the White House demonstrated that through hard work and some yiatlbi, “an uninspiring man could make the American dream come true”.

In 1823 he was admitted to the bar; seven years later he moved his law acerptci to Buffalo, in New York state. He held state office and for eight years was a member of the House of Representatives. In 1848, he was ctdeele Vice President. He presided over the Senate during the months of nerve-wracking bsdetea over the Compromise of 1850 when the south wanted to leave the Union.

The sudden death of President Zachary Taylor in July 1850 eadlveet Fillmore to President. One of his first bills was the Fugitive Slave Act, in which aywurna slaves had to be returned to their owners. Opponents nicknamed it the ‘Bloodhound Law’ after the dogs used to hunt escaped slaves. He also saw California become the 31st state and lioesdbah the slave trade (but not slavery) in the District of Columbia.

He was quite active with his eronfgi policy. He championed the rising trade with Japan and sent Commodore Matthew C. Perry to establish relations with the Japanese. He sueqdah Napoleon III's attempt to annex Hawaii by threatening military action, and did likewise with the British over their efforts to vneadi Cuba. Out of office, he opposed President Lincoln throughout the Civil War. He died on March 8, 1874.


  UNJUMBLE THE WORDS

Millard Fillmore was born in the Finger Lakes country of New York in 1800. States President He of was the the United 13th, serving from 1850-1853. As endured a the youth hardships , of he frontier life and lived in a log cabin. His rise to wealth and the White House demonstrated that through hard work and some ability, “an come make true the uninspiring American man dream could”.

In 1823 he was admitted to the bar; seven years later he moved his law practice to Buffalo, in New York state. He held state office of years the was and a for member eight House of Representatives. In 1848, he was elected Vice President. He over presided of months the during Senate the nerve-wracking debates when the the Compromise south of wanted 1850 over to leave the Union.

The sudden death of President Zachary Taylor in July 1850 elevated Fillmore to President. One of his first bills was the Fugitive Slave Act, had slaves runaway which in returned be to to their owners. Opponents nicknamed it the ‘Bloodhound Law’ after slaves dogs to escaped the used hunt. He also saw California become trade slave the abolished and state 31st the (but not slavery) in the District of Columbia.

with active quite was He policy foreign his. He championed the rising trade with Japan and sent Commodore Matthew C. Perry to establish relations with the Japanese. He quashed Napoleon III's to attempt action military threatening by Hawaii annex, and did likewise the to British invade over Cuba their with efforts. Out of office, he opposed President Lincoln throughout the Civil War. He died on March 8, 1874.


  DISCUSSION (Write your own questions)

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

1.

________________________________________________________

2.

________________________________________________________

3.

________________________________________________________

4.

________________________________________________________

5.

________________________________________________________

6.

________________________________________________________

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STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

1.

________________________________________________________

2.

________________________________________________________

3.

________________________________________________________

4.

________________________________________________________

5.

________________________________________________________

6.

________________________________________________________


  STUDENT MILLARD FILLMORE SURVEY

Write five GOOD questions about Millard Fillmore in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper.

When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

 

STUDENT 1

_____________

STUDENT 2

_____________

STUDENT 3

_____________

Q.1.

 

 

 

 

Q.2.

 

 

 

 

Q.3.

 

 

 

 

Q.4.

 

 

 

 

Q.5.

 

 

 

 

  • Now return to your original partner and share and talk about what you found out. Change partners often.
  • Make mini-presentations to other groups on your findings.

  WRITING

Write about Millard Fillmore for 10 minutes. Show your partner your paper. Correct each other’s work.

______________________________________________________________________________

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  HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET INFO: Search the Internet and find more information about Millard Fillmore. Talk about what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. MAGAZINE ARTICLE: Write a magazine article about Millard Fillmore. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.

4. MILLARD FILLMORE POSTER Make a poster about Millard Fillmore. Show it to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your posters.

5. MY MILLARD FILLMORE LESSON: Make your own English lesson on Millard Fillmore. Make sure there is a good mix of things to do. Find some good online activities. Teach the class / another group when you have finished.

6. ONLINE SHARING: Use your blog, wiki, Facebook page, MySpace page, Twitter stream, Del-icio-us / StumbleUpon account, or any other social media tool to get opinions on Millard Fillmore. Share your findings with the class.

ANSWERS

    You can check your answers to these activities by looking at the article at the top of this page.

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